World War One

Last Soldier to Die in World War One

Some recent research has thrown light on the last soldiers to be killed on 11 November 1918.  The research clearly shows that In the closing minutes of World War One, the 11:00 cease fire within touching distance, a handful of soldiers died. Just after 0500 on the morning of 11 November 1918, officials gathered in a railway carriage and signed a document which would in

Read More

Two Minutes Silence & The Unknown Warrior

November has always been a Month of Remembrance and like many I am sure you had your Two Minutes Silence, many do so on the declared Remembrance Sunday in a local church and many at 11:00 on 11 November, no matter what the day.  This year, as ever, it was both moving and fitting to be stood in the high street as so many people stopped

Read More

The Deadmans Penny

So often on a battlefield tour people are fascinated at the World War One Memorial Plaque, often better known as The Dead Man’s Penny or sometimes The Widows Penny, that was given to the family of the fallen in World War One, and so often the comment ‘I can remember my Gran or a Great Aunt having one of them’ but sadly it has since

Read More

Chilwell Shell Factory Disaster

During battlefield tours I have often spoken about the need, for the first time, of a ‘The Home Front’ during World War One, and how industry was required to support the war effort; and that the Great War was the first true war on an industrial scale.  All bought about be the sheer magnitude and demand of ‘modern’ weapons, that can for the first time

Read More

Titanic Newsboy and a Military Medal

One of the most memorial pictures to come out of the Titanic Disaster was of a newsboy standing in Trafalgar Square selling the newspapers that told the world of the ship’s sinking, the picture was taken on 16 April 1912, just 24 hours after the Titanic went down. The newsboy that morning was a young sixteen year old Ned Parfett often known as The Titanic

Read More

The Amazing Walter Tull

Here in the United Kingdom almost every week we hear stories of racist comments; sadly all too often on the sports field and not always by the spectators, whilst I fully agree that they have no place at all, I wonder if such people know the story of Walter Tull. Walter, the son of a joiner, was born in April 1888 at Folkstone in Kent,

Read More

Most Decorated Soldier of World War One

Much has been written about Captain Noel Chavasse being the most decorated officer of the First World War, and many of you will have joined me as we stood by his grave and tried to understand what drove him to achieve such levels, normally with one of the group reading his citation.  As a reminder he was unique in World War One for earning a

Read More

A Moment to Remember on The Somme

Over the years some people have questioned remembrance, and the wearing of a poppy, saying we are Glorifying War To us all it is worth remembering that Remembrance Sunday and Armistice Day, are not about war but the people who fought in war and paid the ultimate sacrifice, or were so badly injured there wounds haunted them year in year out for the rest of their

Read More

In Flanders Fields the most famous war poem

“In Flanders Fields” is one of the most famous poems from World War One, and is often credited as the reason why the ‘poppy’ was chosen as the flower of remembrance. The poem was written by Canadian physician John McCrae while serving in the Second Battle of Ypres, in Belgium, on 3 May 1915 at a medical dressing station near Essex Farm.  It was written

Read More

St George’s Day & War Poet Rupert Brooke

In England, on 23 April, we celebrated St George’s Day, the patron saint on England. George was credited with slaying the dragon; and it became a day when a traditional English meal is served of Roast Beef & Yorkshire pudding; and by my own observations the tradition still endures, now a display of Union Flags, or Union Jacks, being draped out windows. Add to this

Read More
Page 2 of 41234